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Transcription:

Good day folks. Rod from My Water Filter here today. What we're going to do is have a look at a under sink reverse osmosis water filtration system versus a bench top, or portable, revers osmosis water filtration system. Now, funny thing with these two is the quality of water that they make is gonna be very similar. They've both got a membrane inside of them, and that membrane's filtering right down to 0.0001 micron, very, very fine. It is filtering the water amazingly. Both of these reverse osmosis systems are gonna take all those real nasties out the water, including the fluoride, etcetera, for you. Now, the situation is you'd use them in different situations.

That's the situation. First of all, anybody can take care of a bench top reverse osmosis system. It does have three pipes and it's very simple. If you wanted a portable system, if you're renting, moving around a lot, this is an absolute great system to buy. You just got a diverter here. Basically, you can go to most kitchen sinks tap's spouts, we screw off the aerator, that exposes the thread. This diverter will screw straight on to the existing kitchen tap spout. It will just hang underneath the tap spout like so.

You'll turn on the water. The water'll go straight through and pour into the sink like it always did. When you want this system to make water, we're gonna lift up that lever. The water'll start flowing in the system, it will push it around, and it will push it inside the water filter. It'll go through the appropriate cartridges on the inside, and through the reverse osmosis membrane, where the water will be split. When the water's split, you'll have water flow out of the black hose. That is contaminated water, can go into a bucket, on the plants, down the drain, whatever you like. The blue hose is the pure water that we're going to consume.

Now, reverse osmosis water filters, they filter so well, and the reason that they are so good is they filter so slowly. This water filter and this one is gonna be creating out of this membrane give or take, depending on the pressure of the home, but about 200 mls of water per minute. You'll connect this water filter up. Your tap can be on flat out, but the water coming out of the blue hose is just gonna flow out at about 200 mils a minute.

You need something to store it in. A 20 liter container's great with a tap on the bottom, or a ceramic urn, a jug, whatever you like, but it's something with a good full body that we can fill up with this beautiful, precious water, and store it until you need it because it does take time to turn it on and fill your glass and your cups up with that one. If you're filling the kettle and things like that, you really want to make the water, and have the water ready to go in a 20 liter container or something like that. They make amazing water and they work perfectly well. We have played around with 'em, put larger membranes in 'em, stuff like that, for My Water Filter, but they work unreal. This arrow here, creating the same water, or very, very similar water. This one here is generally used by homeowners to put under the sink.

Hence, you've got the large tank. You've got the system. You've got the bag of goodies and attachments here in front to connect the whole system up. It's not hard to connect up a system like this, but you do need a few tools. You do have a little bit of knowledge. Obviously, we provide instructions, etcetera, for these systems. You don't want it to leak or do anything wrong. If you've got the skills, by all means. Very easy to do, just follow the instructions. If not, plumber can come in and install one in less than an hour. This is gonna work exactly the same way.

Obviously we got a bag of fittings here. Unlike the system here, this water filter is just gonna have an incoming water line. It goes through the pre-sediment filter and the carbon chemical filter at the bottom, and then it comes up and it goes through this big membrane on the top. This membrane splits the water. Once again, the water'll be split. You'll have a black hose, and that'll go down the drain. Then, you'll have another hose that's gonna come over and go into this tank. This is a storage tank. This storage's tank used because this system makes water ever so slowly, 200 mls a minute. It would never keep up the water supply for a family if we didn't use the backup storage tank. It's a 12 liter tank. You'll always have nine plus liters on hand to drink at any one time.

Every time you come to the kitchen faucet, and press on the faucet, it's the bag inside the tank that's gonna push that water out for you. Once the water comes out of the system, it will go through the alkalizer on the top to put some mineral back in it, because reverse osmosis systems are so good, they take everything out of the water, including the mineral, which does tend to make the pH level drop. Hence, we run it through an alkalizer or a re-mineralizer of some description, so you get the pH of the water back up over seven. Then, we'll put it through a bit of carbon, polish it up. Coconut shell carbon makes the water taste beautiful.

Obviously, then out of the faucet and we consume it. Not a lot of differences between 'em. Cheaper to buy, easy to install yourself. Little bit more expensive, still pretty cheap though, and can be installed by yourself or by a plumber, but we do need to have the space to get the tank under the sink, etcetera, but they're made to go under a sink, so they'll fit in most homes. There's no worries with that. Take your pick, whatever suits your situation. Renting, moving around, that sort of thing, or if you own your own home, want a good, stable, quality water filter, these reverse osmosis systems. They are a beauty. Thanks very much for your time. Have a good day.